Coastal First Nations Agreement

Coastal First Nations Agreement

The economic growth foreseen by the agreement means that more people can stay in their communities to work, ensure a good stable income to support their families and reinvest the profits of fishing in the community. Nevertheless, the Court ultimately found that there was a breach of the duty to consult in the present case. This was done on the basis that the province was aware that the petitioners were concerned about the project (concerns that were consistent with those of the province itself in the Northern Gateway joint audit process, but were not resolved) and did not address petitioners on these issues. In particular, the Court found that the province (which had such concerns and was aware of the First Nation`s concerns) could have terminated the equivalency agreement, but decided not to do so. „This historic agreement is the result of several years of cooperation to strengthen the relationship between the Canadian government and First Nations people. The agreement is a decisive step forward and underlines the government`s commitment to ensuring the growth and sustainability of community fisheries. In partnership with Coastal First Nations, we encourage collaborative fisheries management on our province`s north and central coasts to best support the prosperity of these coastal communities. Today, the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, the Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, the Honourable Carolyn Bennett, Chief Marilyn Slett, President of the Coastal First Nations, attended a signing ceremony for the First Nations Coastal Resource Compensation Agreement, along with representatives from the other six nations. This agreement will promote economic opportunities and collaborative governance and expand access to community-based commercial fisheries in traditional areas for the seven nations represented by First Nations. .

14. 9. 2021